FILTER MAKES AMERICA HATE AGAIN

By: MAYA ELIAHOU

In an uninhibited performance of raw, unprocessed sound, industrial rock band Filter kicked off their Make America Hate Again tour recently night at Slim’s in San Francisco. The show featured songs from their recently released album, Crazy Eyes.

The performance began with deconstructed piano music intermixed with electronically distorted speeches from presidential candidate Donald Trump. The music was accompanied by projections and lighting effects, transforming the show from a performance to a multidimensional experience.  

Filter opened with “Mother E”, a song off the band’s latest album. Richard Patrick, lead singer of Filter and former guitarist for Nine Inch Nails, said it was the first time he had ever performed the song live.

While Filter played many of their new songs, the band also played songs from past albums like Anthems for the Dead and The Trouble with Angels. They also performed “Trip Like I Do,” a song that was originally a collaboration between Filter and The Crystal Method.

The audience was primarily composed of long-time fans who have followed Patrick since he left Nine Inch Nails in 1993. During the show, Patrick spoke to the audience candidly about his age and graying hair.

“I don’t feel any older though,” he said. “It’s awesome.”

Audience members like Walnut Creek resident Dave Caldwell said what they appreciate most about Filter is that each album is somewhat different.

“I think (Patrick) makes each album so personal and he makes it unique and his own … but you can still always tell that it’s Filter,” Caldwell said.

Patrick is traditionally the only static member in each Filter album. Joining Patrick on Crazy Eyes is drummer Chris Reeve, guitarist Oumi Kapila, keyboardist Bobby Millar and bassist Ashley Dzergian. In addition to being lead singer, Patrick also self-produced Filter’s latest album to preserve his artistic vision.

Crazy Eyes is the first album released since 2013’s The Sun Comes Out Tonight. The album represents a shift in direction for the band, whose past albums have focused more on crunchy guitar elements and heavy drums.

“This record is more experimental and crazy. It’s where I am today,” Patrick told Billboard. “I wanted to go to some scary, weird places instead of doing that big-ass guitar sound again.”

Opening for Filter were Death Valley High, Vampires Everywhere and Orgy, who set the tone for the evening with their young talent and passion for the industrial metal genre.

The dark, deconstructed energy of all of the performances left the audience, and myself, cheering for more.

Patrick spoke to the audience several times throughout the set, going off on seemingly random tangents and engaging with the crowd.

Heavy industrial crunch and solemn, ambient songs. Uninhibited raw sound. Compelling, unprocessed. Unrestrained air vibrate

Opening for Filter were Death Valley High, Vampires Everywhere, and Orgy.

Dark, deconstructed, raw sound and raw energy matched the venu.

Patrick spoke to the audience candidly about his age and graying hair. “I don’t feel any older though. It’s awesome,” he said.

“Words cannot express how awesome it is to be in San Francisco,” Patrick said.

“I fucking went gray. How’d that happen?”

He asked the audience who in the audeince was young.

“Who here is young at heart?”

“This is the livest band we’ve been in a while.” referring to how many band members were on stage.

He has known them since their first album and has seen them perform “probably too many times”.

“Every album is a little bit different and this album is kind of a darker album and it’s great that Richard Patrick makes it so different. I think he makes each album so personal and he makes it his own and he’s really creative about his process but you can still always tell that it’s Filter.